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How to Care for Your Lithops

Introduction

Lithops, or Living Stones, are one of the strangest, yet rewarding succulents to care for. Hailing from South Africa, they have a very unusual growing cycle that makes caring for them very challenging. However, if you learn the proper way to grow a Lithops, you will be gifted with a unique plant that will stand out in your succulent collection.

Lighting

Lithops prefer bright, indirect sunlight to full sunlight; at least 4-5 hours of direct sunlight a day is recommended. You can place your Lithops by a south-facing window where it will get plenty of sunlight to grow.

Soil and Potting

The taproot of a Lithops can be up to 6 inches, so it is best to use a deep pot when necessary. Lithops need sandy soil; mixing 1 part sand to 2 part succulent soil would be enough for your Lithops. Make sure there is a hole at the bottom of the pot so that the water can drain; place the pot in a saucer if necessary.

Watering

When learning how to take care of lithops, you must remember that watering your Lithops is very different from watering other succulents. You still need to water only when the soil is dry, but Lithops have a unique growing cycle that you need to follow when you learn how to take care of Lithops.

  • Autumn: This is when Lithops begin their growing cycle. Drench the Lithops for the first time, then only water lightly every two weeks
  • Winter: DO NOT WATER YOUR LITHOPS IN WINTER. During the winter, a new pair of leaves grows and the old leaves begin to shrivel away. Watering your Lithops in winter causes it to get confused, causing both leaves to dry.
  • Spring: By spring, only a shriveled husk should remain of the old leaves, which can be removed easily. Water lightly the first time, then increase to full watering every two weeks.
  • Summer: DO NOT WATER YOUR LITHOPS IN SUMMER. Lithops go into dormancy during summer, and watering will cause your Lithops to become soft and rot.

Fertilizers

Lithops grow in nutrient-poor soil. It is possible to not fertilize them at all and still have healthy Lithops.

Conclusion

Learning how to care for Lithops can be quite difficult, especially as so many of their needs differ from other succulents. They are beautiful, unique succulents that will stay alive for as long as 50 years, becoming a true lifetime companion if you follow the steps as above.

Introduction

Lithops, or Living Stones, are one of the strangest, yet rewarding succulents to care for. Hailing from South Africa, they have a very unusual growing cycle that makes caring for them very challenging. However, if you learn how to care for lithops properly, you will be gifted with a unique plant that will stand out in your succulent collection.

Lighting

Lithops prefer bright, indirect sunlight to full sunlight; at least 4-5 hours of direct sunlight a day is recommended. You can place your Lithops by a south-facing window where it will get plenty of sunlight to grow.

Soil and Potting

The taproot of a Lithops can be up to 6 inches, so it is best to use a deep pot when necessary. Lithops need sandy soil; mixing 1 part sand to 2 part succulent soil would be enough for your Lithops. Make sure there is a hole at the bottom of the pot so that the water can drain; place the pot in a saucer if necessary.

Watering

When learning how to take care of lithops, you must remember that watering your Lithops is very different from watering other succulents. You still need to water only when the soil is dry, but Lithops have a unique growing cycle that you need to follow when you learn how to take care of Lithops.


  • Autumn: This is when Lithops begin their growing cycle. Drench the Lithops for the first time, then only water lightly every two weeks
  • Winter: DO NOT WATER YOUR LITHOPS IN WINTER. During the winter, a new pair of leaves grows and the old leaves begin to shrivel away. Watering your Lithops in winter causes it to get confused, causing both leaves to dry.
  • Spring: By spring, only a shriveled husk should remain of the old leaves, which can be removed easily. Water lightly the first time, then increase to full watering every two weeks.
  • Summer: DO NOT WATER YOUR LITHOPS IN SUMMER. Lithops go into dormancy during summer, and watering will cause your Lithops to become soft and rot.

Fertilizers

Lithops grow in nutrient-poor soil. It is possible to not fertilize them at all and still have healthy Lithops.

Conclusion

Learning how to care for Lithops can be quite difficult, especially as so many of their needs differ from other succulents. They are beautiful, unique succulents that will stay alive for as long as 50 years, becoming a true lifetime companion if you follow the steps as above.