What’s the Difference Between House Plant & Succulent Soil?

What’s the Difference Between House Plant & Succulent Soil?

Plant Collective
4 minute read

Some of the most frequently asked questions we receive are regarding planting substrates and the differences between our house plant soil and our succulent soil. Tropical foliage house plants have differing needs from succulents that grow in arid landscapes, so each of our soil substrates is formulated and mixed in-house to best cater to the specific needs of certain plants. Today, we will break down each formula as best we can to help you understand the needs between tropical vs desert plants.

Tropical plants typically grow in warm, densely packed areas such as rainforests. To mimic their natural growing environments, the soil used for tropical house plants needs to be rich with nutrients, pH neutral, able to retain and evenly distribute moisture while also being well-draining enough that the plant does not become waterlogged.

a photo of Plant Collective House Plant Soil next to a Monstera Ginny on a pink background


Ingredients in our House Plant Soil

Peat moss: the best soil amendment for optimal absorbency. Peat moss is lightweight, does not compact and retains water better than any other average soil amendment.

Coconut coir: enriches soil (organic) and helps to lighten the soil to avoid soil compaction.

Worm castings: a natural fertilizer that enriches soil to increase plant production that also helps retain moisture, provides aeration and helps to protect plants from pests and disease.

Pine bark fines: an organic mulch material that helps to increase water retention and improve drainage.

Puffed volcanic glass (perlite): a stable and sterile material that loosens soil to avoid compaction, insulates soil, provides optimal drainage and provides aeration to help plant roots to receive oxygen and nutrients.

Activated charcoal: a soil additive and conditioner that provides potassium, protects plants from pests and fungal diseases and helps to provide drainage.

 

Succulents naturally grow in hot, dry regions such as deserts and succulent woodlands. They have a unique ability to store water in their bodies and leaves to sustain themselves through long periods of drought. This makes them susceptible to moisture issues and rot if they are over-watered or if their soil does not dry out fast enough after watering.



a photo of Plant Collective Succulent Soil displayed with a succulent terrarium kit

Ingredients in our Succulent Soil

Pine bark fines: an organic mulch material that helps to increase water retention and improve drainage.

Coconut coir: enriches soil (organic) and helps to lighten the soil to avoid soil compaction so that succulents can establish strong root systems.

Activated charcoal: a soil additive and conditioner that provides potassium, protects plants from pests and fungal diseases, and helps to provide drainage.

Puffed volcanic glass (perlite): a stable and sterile material that loosens soil to avoid compaction, insulates soil, provides optimal drainage, and provides aeration to help plant roots to receive oxygen and nutrients.

Pumice: a sterile and textured volcanic rock that provides optimal drainage, is beneficial in providing optimal aeration, and breaks up soil to provide space for very strong root growth.

Extra grit: sand and finely crushed stone as a filler to help provide better drainage.

 

Additional additives:

a photo of Plant Collective Perlite on a yellow background

 

Perlite: Can be added into any soil where more aeration or drainage is needed even if the substrate already contains perlite. If you grow low light tropical house plants that do not receive much sunlight to help evaporate water after watering, perlite can be added to the soil mixture to aid in aeration and to help avoid moisture issues such as fungal disease and root rot.

 

a photo of Plant Collective Pumice on a light blue background

Pumice: Can be added to any succulent soil mix to provide better drainage and aeration. Pumice is an especially beneficial additive to succulents that are hyper-sensitive to moisture, such as cacti. As with perlite, pumice can be added to a substrate even if it already contains pumice. Customizing soil mixes where needed is super beneficial!

 

a photo of someone adding perlite to a potted house plant a photo of someone adding pumice to a potted succulent

We hope you enjoyed reading this article and that it has left you with better knowledge and insight regarding the soil types that you choose for your plants. Proper substrate leads to strong root systems that will help give your plants a head-start to a happy and healthy life. Happy growing!

House Plant Soil

House Plant Soil

$8.00

Our proprietary blend of house plant soil was created specifically for your precious plant babies. We designed it to help prevent root rot and increase drainage while providing the nutrients they crave. Mixed in-house!   Size: Medium - 1 Litre per bag (approx.) Large… Read More

Succulent Soil

Succulent Soil

$9.99

Our proprietary blend of fast-draining succulent soil was created specifically for your precious succulent babies. We designed it to help prevent root rot and it contains none of the conventional ingredients you would find in regular potting soil such as sphagnum/peat moss (which… Read More

Perlite

Perlite

$6.99

Details Perlite is an amorphous volcanic glass that is heated up to 1000° C until it puffs up and pops! It is a lightweight and porous material that offers low water retention. Benefits - Improves aeration and so that soil… Read More

Pumice

Pumice

$9.99

Details Horticultural pumice is a solidified foam that is formed from lava. It is an inorganic material that is odourless, does not break down, decompose, rot, and does not attract bugs. It is very porous and rough in texture making… Read More

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